Dendro dating ireland

06-Jan-2017 08:22

I have worked with a range of research projects, particularly with a maritime and/or timber trade theme, in Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Germany, Scotland and Ireland.

Recent projects include wood studies of the Drogheda Boat and its barrel cargo, dating and provenance determination of the wharf and shipwrecks from Oslo Harbour, dating and provenance of fine art (painted on oak panels) at the Danish National Gallery, and non-destructive dendrochronology, where industrial CT scanning of wood objects from the Norwegian Viking ship burials at Oseberg and Gokstad has enabled non-invasive dating and provenance studies of over 90 objects.

Due to a generous grant from the Marie Curie Intra-European Fellowship (IEF), I have completed the project, Chronology, Culture and Archaeology (CCA).

From June 2011 to June 2013 I carried out tree-ring studies of wood structures found in wetland contexts in Ireland, chiefly fishing structures on the inter-tidal zone of the Fergus Estuary, in Co. This work is allowing detailed chronology of the structures to be constructed, so that we can map the intensity of the medieval fisheries in these waters.

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The basic theory of the dendrochronological method is of extreme simplicity.

Most trees in a temperate climate develop one growth increment or ring per year, thus over their lifetime they leave a record of the number of years they have been growing.

This record is preserved as a series of concentric rings exhibited in a cross-section of their main stem.

In 2003, I was awarded a grant from the Elisabeth Munksgaard Fund, Denmark, for the preparation of the paper 'The dendrochronological dating of timber crossings in west Jutland, Denmark', which is published in the peer-reviewed Journal of Wetland Archaeology, 2006. In my thesis, 'Timber, Trade and Tree-rings', I refined the method in which dendrochronology is used to determine the area of origin of timbers found in archaeological/historical contexts.

I then examined the insights this provides us with, in the context of the history of Northern European timber trade.

The basic theory of the dendrochronological method is of extreme simplicity.Most trees in a temperate climate develop one growth increment or ring per year, thus over their lifetime they leave a record of the number of years they have been growing.This record is preserved as a series of concentric rings exhibited in a cross-section of their main stem.In 2003, I was awarded a grant from the Elisabeth Munksgaard Fund, Denmark, for the preparation of the paper 'The dendrochronological dating of timber crossings in west Jutland, Denmark', which is published in the peer-reviewed Journal of Wetland Archaeology, 2006. In my thesis, 'Timber, Trade and Tree-rings', I refined the method in which dendrochronology is used to determine the area of origin of timbers found in archaeological/historical contexts.I then examined the insights this provides us with, in the context of the history of Northern European timber trade.Until recently the same comment would have been valid for most of the extant early buildings, at least in the North of Ireland.